11选5公式:Poems by Li Po (also known as Li Bai A.D. 701 - 762)

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LI PO (701 - 62) He and his comtemporary Tu Fu are regarded as the two greatest poets of the greatest period of Shih poetry. Li left his home at Ch'ang-ming, Szechwan, about 720, and for twenty years wandered from place to place, occasionally seeking official employment but not through the examinations. For a short period (742 - 4) he enjoyed favour as a court poet at the capital of Ch'ang-an, but thereafter he resumed his wanderings. Late in his life he was involved in the revolt of Prince Lin and banished (758) to Yeh-lang (Yunnan), but pardoned before he reached there. A great drinker and dabbler in Taoism, Li is the supreme example of irresponsibility among Chinese poets. 

-- from The Penguin Book of Chinese Verse, Edited by A.R. Davis, Penguin Books, 1962. 



DOWN ZHONGNAN MOUNTAIN 
TO THE KIND PILLOW AND BOWL OF HUSI

Down the blue mountain in the evening, 
Moonlight was my homeward escort. 
Looking back, I saw my path 
Lie in levels of deep shadow.... 
I was passing the farm-house of a friend, 
When his children called from a gate of thorn 
And led me twining through jade bamboos 
Where green vines caught and held my clothes. 
And I was glad of a chance to rest 
And glad of a chance to drink with my friend.... 
We sang to the tune of the wind in the pines; 
And we finished our songs as the stars went down, 
When, I being drunk and my friend more than happy, 
Between us we forgot the world. 


DRINKING ALONE WITH THE MOON

From a pot of wine among the flowers 
I drank alone. There was no one with me -- 
Till, raising my cup, I asked the bright moon 
To bring me my shadow and make us three. 
Alas, the moon was unable to drink 
And my shadow tagged me vacantly; 
But still for a while I had these friends 
To cheer me through the end of spring.... 
I sang. The moon encouraged me. 
I danced. My shadow tumbled after. 
As long as I knew, we were boon companions. 
And then I was drunk, and we lost one another. 
...Shall goodwill ever be secure? 
I watch the long road of the River of Stars. 


IN SPRING

Your grasses up north are as blue as jade, 
Our mulberries here curve green-threaded branches; 
And at last you think of returning home, 
Now when my heart is almost broken.... 
O breeze of the spring, since I dare not know you, 
Why part the silk curtains by my bed? 


THE MOON AT THE FORTIFIED PASS

The bright moon lifts from the Mountain of Heaven 
In an infinite haze of cloud and sea, 
And the wind, that has come a thousand miles, 
Beats at the Jade Pass battlements.... 
China marches its men down Baideng Road 
While Tartar troops peer across blue waters of the bay.... 
And since not one battle famous in history 
Sent all its fighters back again, 
The soldiers turn round, looking toward the border, 
And think of home, with wistful eyes, 
And of those tonight in the upper chambers 
Who toss and sigh and cannot rest. 


BALLADS OF FOUR SEASONS: SPRING

The lovely Lo Fo of the western land 
Plucks mulberry leaves by the waterside. 
Across the green boughs stretches out her white hand; 
In golden sunshine her rosy robe is dyed. 
"my silkworms are hungry, I cannot stay. 
Tarry not with your five-horse cab, I pray." 


BALLADS OF FOUR SEASONS: SUMMER

On Mirror Lake outspread for miles and miles, 
The lotus lilies in full blossom teem. 
In fifth moon Xi Shi gathers them with smiles, 
Watchers o'erwhelm the bank of Yuoye Stream. 
Her boat turns back without waiting moonrise 
To yoyal house amid amorous sighs. 


A SONG OF AN AUTUMN MIDNIGHT

A slip of the moon hangs over the capital; 
Ten thousand washing-mallets are pounding; 
And the autumn wind is blowing my heart 
For ever and ever toward the Jade Pass.... 
Oh, when will the Tartar troops be conquered, 
And my husband come back from the long campaign! 


BALLADS OF FOUR SEASONS: WINTER

The courier will depart next day, she's told. 
She sews a warrior's gown all night. 
Her fingers feel the needle cold. 
How can she hold the scissors tight? 
The work is done, she sends it far away. 
When will it reach the town where warriors stay? 


A SONG OF CHANGGAN

My hair had hardly covered my forehead. 
I was picking flowers, paying by my door, 
When you, my lover, on a bamboo horse, 
Came trotting in circles and throwing green plums. 
We lived near together on a lane in Ch'ang-kan, 
Both of us young and happy-hearted. 
...At fourteen I became your wife, 
So bashful that I dared not smile, 
And I lowered my head toward a dark corner 
And would not turn to your thousand calls; 
But at fifteen I straightened my brows and laughed, 
Learning that no dust could ever seal our love, 
That even unto death I would await you by my post 
And would never lose heart in the tower of silent watching. 
...Then when I was sixteen, you left on a long journey 
Through the Gorges of Ch'u-t'ang, of rock and whirling water. 
And then came the Fifth-month, more than I could bear, 
And I tried to hear the monkeys in your lofty far-off sky. 
Your footprints by our door, where I had watched you go, 
Were hidden, every one of them, under green moss, 
Hidden under moss too deep to sweep away. 
And the first autumn wind added fallen leaves. 
And now, in the Eighth-month, yellowing butterflies 
Hover, two by two, in our west-garden grasses 
And, because of all this, my heart is breaking 
And I fear for my bright cheeks, lest they fade. 
...Oh, at last, when you return through the three Pa districts, 
Send me a message home ahead! 
And I will come and meet you and will never mind the distance, 
All the way to Chang-feng Sha. 


A SONG OF LU MOUNTAIN TO CENSOR LU XUZHOU

I am the madman of the Chu country 
Who sang a mad song disputing Confucius. 
...Holding in my hand a staff of green jade, 
I have crossed, since morning at the Yellow Crane Terrace, 
All five Holy Mountains, without a thought of distance, 
According to the one constant habit of my life. 
Lu Mountain stands beside the Southern Dipper 
In clouds reaching silken like a nine-panelled screen, 
With its shadows in a crystal lake deepening the green water. 
The Golden Gate opens into two mountain-ranges. 
A silver stream is hanging down to three stone bridges 
Within sight of the mighty Tripod Falls. 
Ledges of cliff and winding trails lead to blue sky 
And a flush of cloud in the morning sun, 
Whence no flight of birds could be blown into Wu. 
...I climb to the top. I survey the whole world. 
I see the long river that runs beyond return, 
Yellow clouds that winds have driven hundreds of miles 
And a snow-peak whitely circled by the swirl of a ninefold stream. 
And so I am singing a song of Lu Mountain, 
A song that is born of the breath of Lu Mountain. 
...Where the Stone Mirror makes the heart's purity purer 
And green moss has buried the footsteps of Xie, 
I have eaten the immortal pellet and, rid of the world's troubles, 
Before the lute's third playing have achieved my element. 
Far away I watch the angels riding coloured clouds 
Toward heaven's Jade City, with hibiscus in their hands. 
And so, when I have traversed the nine sections of the world, 
I will follow Saint Luao up the Great Purity. 


TIANMU MOUNTAIN ASCENDED IN A DREAM

A seafaring visitor will talk about Japan, 
Which waters and mists conceal beyond approach; 
But Yueh people talk about Heavenly Mother Mountain, 
Still seen through its varying deeps of cloud. 
In a straight line to heaven, its summit enters heaven, 
Tops the five Holy Peaks, and casts a shadow through China 
With the hundred-mile length of the Heavenly Terrace Range, 
Which, just at this point, begins turning southeast. 
...My heart and my dreams are in Wu and Yueh 
And they cross Mirror Lake all night in the moon. 
And the moon lights my shadow 
And me to Yan River -- 
With the hermitage of Xie still there 
And the monkeys calling clearly over ripples of green water. 
I wear his pegged boots 
Up a ladder of blue cloud, 
Sunny ocean half-way, 
Holy cock-crow in space, 
Myriad peaks and more valleys and nowhere a road. 
Flowers lure me, rocks ease me. Day suddenly ends. 
Bears, dragons, tempestuous on mountain and river, 
Startle the forest and make the heights tremble. 
Clouds darken with darkness of rain, 
Streams pale with pallor of mist. 
The Gods of Thunder and Lightning 
Shatter the whole range. 
The stone gate breaks asunder 
Venting in the pit of heaven, 
An impenetrable shadow. 
...But now the sun and moon illumine a gold and silver terrace, 
And, clad in rainbow garments, riding on the wind, 
Come the queens of all the clouds, descending one by one, 
With tigers for their lute-players and phoenixes for dancers. 
Row upon row, like fields of hemp, range the fairy figures. 
I move, my soul goes flying, 
I wake with a long sigh, 
My pillow and my matting 
Are the lost clouds I was in. 
...And this is the way it always is with human joy: 
Ten thousand things run for ever like water toward the east. 
And so I take my leave of you, not knowing for how long. 
...But let me, on my green slope, raise a white deer 
And ride to you, great mountain, when I have need of you. 
Oh, how can I gravely bow and scrape to men of high rank and men of high office 
Who never will suffer being shown an honest-hearted face! 


PARTING AT A WINE-SHOP IN NANJING

A wind, bringing willow-cotton, sweetens the shop, 
And a girl from Wu, pouring wine, urges me to share it 
With my comrades of the city who are here to see me off; 
And as each of them drains his cup, I say to him in parting, 
Oh, go and ask this river running to the east 
If it can travel farther than a friend's love! 


A FAREWELL TO SECRETARY SHUYUN 
AT THE XIETIAO VILLA IN XUANZHOU

Since yesterday had to throw me and bolt, 
Today has hurt my heart even more. 
The autumn wildgeese have a long wind for escort 
As I face them from this villa, drinking my wine. 
The bones of great writers are your brushes, in the School of Heaven, 
And I am a Lesser Xie growing up by your side. 
We both are exalted to distant thought, 
Aspiring to the sky and the bright moon. 
But since water still flows, though we cut it with our swords, 
And sorrows return, though we drown them with wine, 
Since the world can in no way answer our craving, 
I will loosen my hair tomorrow and take to a fishingboat. 


HARD ROADS IN SHU

Oh, but it is high and very dangerous! 
Such travelling is harder than scaling the blue sky. 
...Until two rulers of this region 
Pushed their way through in the misty ages, 
Forty-eight thousand years had passed 
With nobody arriving across the Qin border. 
And the Great White Mountain, westward, still has only a bird's path 
Up to the summit of Emei Peak -- 
Which was broken once by an earthquake and there were brave men lost, 
Just finishing the stone rungs of their ladder toward heaven. 
...High, as on a tall flag, six dragons drive the sun, 
While the river, far below, lashes its twisted course. 
Such height would be hard going for even a yellow crane, 
So pity the poor monkeys who have only paws to use. 
The Mountain of Green Clay is formed of many circles- 
Each hundred steps, we have to turn nine turns among its mound -- 
Panting, we brush Orion and pass the Well Star, 
Then, holding our chests with our hands and sinking to the ground with a groan, 
We wonder if this westward trail will never have an end. 
The formidable path ahead grows darker, darker still, 
With nothing heard but the call of birds hemmed in by the ancient forest, 
Male birds smoothly wheeling, following the females; 
And there come to us the melancholy voices of the cuckoos 
Out on the empty mountain, under the lonely moon.... 
Such travelling is harder than scaling the blue sky. 
Even to hear of it turns the cheek pale, 
With the highest crag barely a foot below heaven. 
Dry pines hang, head down, from the face of the cliffs, 
And a thousand plunging cataracts outroar one another 
And send through ten thousand valleys a thunder of spinning stones. 
With all this danger upon danger, 
Why do people come here who live at a safe distance? 
...Though Dagger-Tower Pass be firm and grim, 
And while one man guards it 
Ten thousand cannot force it, 
What if he be not loyal, 
But a wolf toward his fellows? 
...There are ravenous tigers to fear in the day 
And venomous reptiles in the night 
With their teeth and their fangs ready 
To cut people down like hemp. 
Though the City of Silk be delectable, I would rather turn home quickly. 
Such travelling is harder than scaling the blue sky.... 
But I still face westward with a dreary moan. 


ENDLESS YEARNING I

"I am endlessly yearning 
To be in Changan. 
...Insects hum of autumn by the gold brim of the well; 
A thin frost glistens like little mirrors on my cold mat; 
The high lantern flickers; and. deeper grows my longing. 
I lift the shade and, with many a sigh, gaze upon the moon, 
Single as a flower, centred from the clouds. 
Above, I see the blueness and deepness of sky. 
Below, I see the greenness and the restlessness of water.... 
Heaven is high, earth wide; bitter between them flies my sorrow. 
Can I dream through the gateway, over the mountain? 
Endless longing 
Breaks my heart." 


ENDLESS YEARNING II

"The sun has set, and a mist is in the flowers; 
And the moon grows very white and people sad and sleepless. 
A Zhao harp has just been laid mute on its phoenix holder, 
And a Shu lute begins to sound its mandarin-duck strings.... 
Since nobody can bear to you the burden of my song, 
Would that it might follow the spring wind to Yanran Mountain. 
I think of you far away, beyond the blue sky, 
And my eyes that once were sparkling 
Are now a well of tears. 
...Oh, if ever you should doubt this aching of my heart, 
Here in my bright mirror come back and look at me!" 


THE HARD ROAD

Pure wine costs, for the golden cup, ten thousand coppers a flagon, 
And a jade plate of dainty food calls for a million coins. 
I fling aside my food-sticks and cup, I cannot eat nor drink.... 
I pull out my dagger, I peer four ways in vain. 
I would cross the Yellow River, but ice chokes the ferry; 
I would climb the Taihang Mountains, but the sky is blind with snow.... 
I would sit and poise a fishing-pole, lazy by a brook -- 
But I suddenly dream of riding a boat, sailing for the sun.... 
Journeying is hard, 
Journeying is hard. 
There are many turnings -- 
Which am I to follow?.... 
I will mount a long wind some day and break the heavy waves 
And set my cloudy sail straight and bridge the deep, deep sea. 


HARD IS THE WAY OF THE WORLD II

The way is broad like the blue sky, 
But no way out before my eye. 
I am ashamed to follow those who have no guts, 
Gambling on fighting cocks and dogs for pears and nuts. 
Feng would go homeward way, having no fish to eat; 
Zhou did not think to bow to noblemen was meet. 
General Han was mocked in the market-place; 
The brilliant scholar Jia was banished in disgrace. 
Have you not heard of King of Yan in days gone by, 
Who venerated talents and built Terrace high 
On which he offered gold to gifted men 
And stooped low and swept the floor to welcome them? 
Grateful, Ju Xin and Yue Yi came then 
And served him heart and soul, both full of stratagem. 
The King's bones were now buried, 
who would sweep the floor of the Gold Terrace any more? 
Hard is the way. 
Go back without delay! 


HARD IS THE WAY OF THE WORLD III

Don't wash your ears on hearing something you dislike 
Nor die of hunger like famous hermits on the Pike! 
Living without a fame among the motley crowd, 
Why should one be as lofty as the moon or cloud? 
Of ancient talents who failed to retire, there's none 
But came to tragic ending after glory's won. 
The head of General Wu was hung o'er city gate; 
In the river was drowned the poet laureate. 
The highly talented scholar wished in vain 
To preserve his life to hear the cry of the crane. 
Minister Li regretted not to have retired 
To hunt with falcon gray as he had long desired. 
Have you not heard of Zhang Han who resigned, carefree, 
To go home to eat his perch with high glee? 
Enjoy a cup of wine while you're alive! 
Do not care if your fame will not survive! 


BRINGING IN THE WINE

See how the Yellow River's waters move out of heaven. 
Entering the ocean, never to return. 
See how lovely locks in bright mirrors in high chambers, 
Though silken-black at morning, have changed by night to snow. 
...Oh, let a man of spirit venture where he pleases 
And never tip his golden cup empty toward the moon! 
Since heaven gave the talent, let it be employed! 
Spin a thousand pieces of silver, all of them come back! 
Cook a sheep, kill a cow, whet the appetite, 
And make me, of three hundred bowls, one long drink! 
...To the old master, Cen, 
And the young scholar, Danqiu, 
Bring in the wine! 
Let your cups never rest! 
Let me sing you a song! 
Let your ears attend! 
What are bell and drum, rare dishes and treasure? 
Let me be forever drunk and never come to reason! 
Sober men of olden days and sages are forgotten, 
And only the great drinkers are famous for all time. 
...Prince Chen paid at a banquet in the Palace of Perfection 
Ten thousand coins for a cask of wine, with many a laugh and quip. 
Why say, my host, that your money is gone? 
Go and buy wine and we'll drink it together! 
My flower-dappled horse, 
My furs worth a thousand, 
Hand them to the boy to exchange for good wine, 
And we'll drown away the woes of ten thousand generations! 


A MESSAGE TO MENG HAORAN

Master, I hail you from my heart, 
And your fame arisen to the skies.... 
Renouncing in ruddy youth the importance of hat and chariot, 
You chose pine-trees and clouds; and now, whitehaired, 
Drunk with the moon, a sage of dreams, 
Flower- bewitched, you are deaf to the Emperor.... 
High mountain, how I long to reach you, 
Breathing your sweetness even here! 


BIDDING A FRIEND FAREWELL AT JINGMEN FERRY

Sailing far off from Jingmen Ferry, 
Soon you will be with people in the south, 
Where the mountains end and the plains begin 
And the river winds through wilderness.... 
The moon is lifted like a mirror, 
Sea-clouds gleam like palaces, 
And the water has brought you a touch of home 
To draw your boat three hundred miles. 


A FAREWELL TO A FRIEND

With a blue line of mountains north of the wall, 
And east of the city a white curve of water, 
Here you must leave me and drift away 
Like a loosened water-plant hundreds of miles.... 
I shall think of you in a floating cloud; 
So in the sunset think of me. 
...We wave our hands to say good-bye, 
And my horse is neighing again and again. 


ON HEARING JUN THE BUDDHIST MONK 
FROM SHU PLAY HIS LUTE 

The monk from Shu with his green silk lute-case, 
Walking west down Omei Mountain, 
Has brought me by one touch of the strings 
The breath of pines in a thousand valleys. 
I hear him in the cleansing brook, 
I hear him in the icy bells; 
And I feel no change though the mountain darken 
And cloudy autumn heaps the sky. 


THOUGHTS OF OLD TIME FROM A NIGHT-MOORING 
UNDER MOUNT NIU-ZHU

This night to the west of the river-brim 
There is not one cloud in the whole blue sky, 
As I watch from my deck the autumn moon, 
Vainly remembering old General Xie.... 
I have poems; I can read; 
He heard others, but not mine. 
...Tomorrow I shall hoist my sail, 
With fallen maple-leaves behind me.


ON CLIMBING IN NANJING TO THE TERRACE 
OF PHOENIXES

Phoenixes that played here once, so that the place was named for them, 
Have abandoned it now to this desolate river; 
The paths of Wu Palace are crooked with weeds; 
The garments of Qin are ancient dust. 
...Like this green horizon halving the Three Peaks, 
Like this Island of White Egrets dividing the river, 
A cloud has arisen between the Light of Heaven and me, 
To hide his city from my melancholy heart. 


IN THE QUIET NIGHT

So bright a gleam on the foot of my bed -- 
Could there have been a frost already? 
Lifting myself to look, I found that it was moonlight. 
Sinking back again, I thought suddenly of home. 


A BITTER LOVE

How beautiful she looks, opening the pearly casement, 
And how quiet she leans, and how troubled her brow is! 
You may see the tears now, bright on her cheek, 
But not the man she so bitterly loves. 


A SIGH FROM A STAIRCASE OF JADE

Her jade-white staircase is cold with dew; 
Her silk soles are wet, she lingered there so long.... 
Behind her closed casement, why is she still waiting, 
Watching through its crystal pane the glow of the autumn moon? 


A FAREWELL TO MENG HAORAN 
ON HIS WAY TO YANGZHOU

You have left me behind, old friend, at the Yellow Crane Terrace, 
On your way to visit Yangzhou in the misty month of flowers; 
Your sail, a single shadow, becomes one with the blue sky, 
Till now I see only the river, on its way to heaven. 


THROUGH THE YANGZI GORGES

From the walls of Baidi high in the coloured dawn 
To Jiangling by night-fall is three hundred miles, 
Yet monkeys are still calling on both banks behind me 
To my boat these ten thousand mountains away. 


A SONG OF PURE HAPPINESS I

Her robe is a cloud, her face a flower; 
Her balcony, glimmering with the bright spring dew, 
Is either the tip of earth's Jade Mountain 
Or a moon- edged roof of paradise. 


A SONG OF PURE HAPPINESS II

There's a perfume stealing moist from a shaft of red blossom, 
And a mist, through the heart, from the magical Hill of Wu- - 
The palaces of China have never known such beauty- 
Not even Flying Swallow with all her glittering garments. 


A SONG OF PURE HAPPINESS III 

Lovely now together, his lady and his flowers 
Lighten for ever the Emperor's eye, 
As he listens to the sighing of the far spring wind 
Where she leans on a railing in the Aloe Pavilion.

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